Articles, Newsletters, Podcasts, and Video

I’m Convinced COVID-19 Vaccines (and My Mum) Saved My Life

By Sherry Toh / 2022-06-22
Posted in

When my little brother and I were barely out of our toddler years, there was one question I’d constantly hear other parents ask my mum:

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A Cure SMA Travel Adventure That Starts With a Bump in the Road

By Kevin Schaefer / 2022-06-14
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As I write this, I’m sitting in the lobby of a Las Vegas hotel. This morning, I awoke to breathtaking views of giant Utah canyons,

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A Cure SMA Travel Adventure That Starts With a Bump in the Road

By Kevin Schaefer / 2022-06-14
Posted in

As I write this, I’m sitting in the lobby of a Las Vegas hotel. This morning, I awoke to breathtaking views of giant Utah canyons,

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Adios, April! Hello, May(hem)!

By Helen Baldwin / 2022-05-11
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April brought with it more than showers in the water department.

Our son Matthew and his family visited our daughter and son-in-law, Katie and Paul,

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Doing Your Thing With Disability: Question Living Blind & Famous

By T.Reid / 2022-04-27
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We reached the final episode of the season where we salute and recognize individuals who are pursuing their interests and goals not in spite of their disability but rather with it. The difference may seem minor to some, but if you’re someone who wants to see disability normalized in society then you probably recognize this […]

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Thanks, but Your Prayers Really Aren’t Necessary

By Brianna Albers / 2022-04-04
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Last Sunday, my dad took me by surprise.

“I don’t have anything planned for today,” he said as he helped me get out of bed.

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It Started With a Pink Slip

By Helen Baldwin / 2022-03-30
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As my parents’ first child, I checked off the typical firstborn squares. I was conscientious, reliable, structured, cautious, and an achiever — in short, a

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The Art of Snagging Angel Wings

By Helen Baldwin / 2022-03-16
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Is it possible that we might have a bit of input into how we snag our angel wings? It sort of seems like it.

Near

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Crip Siblings: Interview with Chun-san (Sandie) Yi

By Alice Wong / 2022-02-09
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Alice:  Sandie, I am just so delighted to talk with you today and what I loved immediately is that you titled our Zoom meeting ’Crip Siblings’!

Sandie:  [laughs]

Alice:  And I feel this kinship with you. What does it mean to you to find kinship with other crips everywhere? Whether it’s locally or all over the world? What does it mean to you to find a crip sibling?

Sandie:  So I was born with my

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Disabled Woman Pretends Husband is Caregiver so She Can Still Receive Red Envelopes of Money for Lunar New Year

By 2shoes4eyes / 2022-02-02
Posted in

It had been eons since Angie Lee had returned home for the Lunar New Year, and she was looking forward to proudly, and finally, introducing her husband, Chris Kwong, to her judgmental and status-minded extended family. They would know she scored because he was educated, good looking, well mannered and employed — all the attributes her family absolutely loves! She couldn’t wait!

“Gong Xi Fa Cai (Congratulations and may you be prosperous)!” Lee greeted each of her relatives, ready to make the big reveal. “This is Chris, my hus … ”

And then Lee, who has spina bifida, had a lightbulb moment. What if she didn’t tell her relatives she was married? She could really do with some hong bao, red envelopes traditionally filled with cash and given by married couples to young children and single adults as a symbol of prosperity, luck and all that other feel-good stuff. How much could she get?

“My hus … husky, wonderful caregiver,” she said with extra emphasis as she surreptitiously slipped her wedding band off her finger and into her pocket.

Kwong was caught off guard. “I was livid! I was going to walk out!” he said later. “But then the hong bao just kept pouring in and I thought, ‘That’s why I married her! F**king genius!’”

Relatives typically belabor single adults about when they are going to find a partner to marry, but with Lee they knew better. After all, she was disabled.

“No point giving Angie oranges and all the other traditional symbols of wealth, love and happiness. She will always be stuck in that awful wheelchair. What she needs are some goddamn prayers,” said Aunt Kelly, watching the dragon dance.

“Poor Angie. She must have done something evil in her former life to deserve being in such a tragic state,” yelled Uncle Mark over the sound of firecrackers going off. “She’s such a bad luck omen and burden. Who can love her like that?”

At day’s end, Lee and Kwong had amassed quite a fortune. Looking at her reflection in the mirror and at her husband-in-crime, Lee smiled deviously and thought, “I am one badass symbol of happiness and luck right now, and it’s going be a heck of a roaring prosperous year of the tiger!” She then proceeded to make a list of other unsuspecting relatives they could visit in the next 15 days of celebration.

The post Disabled Woman Pretends Husband is Caregiver so She Can Still Receive Red Envelopes of Money for Lunar New Year appeared first on The Squeaky Wheel.

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